Luminescence (Rayne Trilogy: 1)

Luminescence (Rayne Trilogy: 1)

by Quoleen Sbrocca

Well, this one was a surprise. I have to confess, it started off slow and the way the characters spoke in their latin-based language irritated me a little.

However, irritation quickly became endearing and other-worldly and I became immersed in an interesting and exciting world; I felt that I was right there with Rayne as she discovered the results of receiving the Luminescence so late in life. As the book continued, it got better and better and I found myself caring more. By the end, I was eager to read more and have added the next book to my wishlist.

I have only marked it 4 stars because it took almost a third of the book for me to start to love it; I do wish that the first part made for easier reading but I get that this is hard when you are throwing your readers into a world that is so different from our own.

 

Rating: ****

Mine to Tarnish

Mine to Tarnish

A good prequel following Katherine’s story which fills in some interesting blanks from the first book. Short and sweet and written in similarly good style, it was a nice read although i didn’t enjoy it as much as “You are mine”. I don’t recommend reading this one first, definitely start with book 1 and then read this prequel as things will make much more sense in this order and you’ll find yourself caring ┬ámore about Katherine and her story.

 

Rating: ****

Mastering Logical Fallacies

Mastering Logical Fallacies
This book is boring. I persevered through 40% of it before speed-reading the rest to the end. Each of the arguments is laid out one by one in a way that makes you feel like you are reading a dictionary. Some of the examples given were vaguely interesting but will become completely irrelevant in a few years as it heavily borrows from what is current in the news right now. If you want very detailed technical examples of logical fallacies with lots of jargon then you might like it, but this book doesn’t relate to ‘real life’ very well and gets way too bogged down in academics.
Rating: *

Detective Dot

Detective Dot

by Sophie Deen

 

I got the full (physical) package of this, with the CIA card and missions and everything from the seller direct. My daughter loved the CIA card and showed it off to all her friends. She also read the book from beginning to end and seemed to enjoy it. I read it myself too and thought it was nicely put together, well presented with an interesting and unusual storyline.

This book does have a feminist and political slant and comes across as being slightly overdone to me even though i’m in support of this and a coding female myself. I did come to this completely uninitiated and unaware of the kickstarter project which launched the book. The story seems to shock you out of fantasy world quite suddenly with a list of facts and figures about working conditions in China, as one example, which is important to know in my opinion as it will spark discussion with your child which they may or may not be ready to handle – especially if your child is a young and advanced reader. I felt my daughter at 8 wasn’t quite old enough to be broaching some of the subjects raised, i’d recommend it for children 10+.

 

Rating: ****